Posted in all, Weekly Assignments

Week 20 – Overview of webdesign – Get the basics right – Part one

Hello everyone! As I said before, I just finished my first semester and started with my second right away ;). I am so happy to continue learning, It was really fun to work on my own graphic design project but I missed just learning and reading stuff as well, without stressing myself to death. We are starting the semester learning about web design, and it has been really fun so far, it sounds like a really interesting field with a lot of branches and  possibilities, apparently is an ever-growing field that requires you to keep learning if you want to continue working there, which actually sounds quite fun!

This  week I have read about the internet and its infrastructure, about search engines,  HTML,  CSS and JAVA script. After all this I actually feel quite ready to jump into web design already. I started trying out coding with HTML on notepad. It is so fun to see it come to life on the browser. I am looking forward to learning all these new languages and more about web design.

Here is the first part of this weeks learning activity:

 

 

  1. Explain the following terms in your own words

 

The Internet

The internet is a big network of computers connected with one another that allows its users to communicate with people all around the world, share information and find information as well. There is actually nobody that owns the internet since it’s just a connection between personal computers companies and other elements, however it is monitored and maintained in different ways by organisations.  Therefore I think it is really exiting,  because it’s a community that can be seen as a parallel world to our own. It is always there even thought we can’t always see it, unless we have a device to connect us of course.

A strong keyword I would use to describe the internet is “connection”, because without connection we would not have any internet.Let me try to explain my thought. Imagine a group of people who are connected in a way or another, all these people form a network and when you connect that network to others you get a big network of networks and so on. This is what the internet is just an enormous network of networks that allows the world to stay connected. These connection and the internet itself is possible because of several components. These are Networks, ISP’s, NAP’s, DNS’s and powerful servers.

HTML

HTML stands for Hyper text Markup Language, and as the name describes it, it is a language that uses tags to identify what type of content the browser should display. This is the standard  markup language of the internet, it is used to create web pages and web applications together   with CSS and JAVA Script.

 

Browser

A browser is a software for presenting, restoring and passing information in the world wire web. An information source or web content  is identified by a URL that stands for Uniform Resource identifier. Browsers can also be used to access information provided by web servers in private networks . Example of web browsers are Google Chrome, Internet explorer, Safari, Opera and Firefox.

Search engine

The internet is made up of so much information that it would actually be a nightmare to try to find what you are looking for without a proper search engine.  A search engine is a special site that is designed to help you find information stored on other sites, it doesn’t particularly need to find information on the web but these are the ones that the majority of people use. All search engines perform three basic tasks:

  • they search the internet based on important words
  • they keep an index of the words they find and where they find them
  • they allow for users to look for words or combination of words in that index.

Today we can find a good amount of search engines on the internet but there are just a handful of good ones. I have always wondered why it is, and who would have thought spiders had anything to do with it. Well, they don’t, not actual spiders anyway, I don’t think people would be so fond of the internet if this was the case. Spiders are special software robots that build lists of the words they find on websites, their work is also called web crawling. Google built their initial system to use multiple spiders  these allowed them to get and process information much faster, when a google spider looked at an html page it took note of two things, the words within the page and where they were found. The google spider was built to index every significant word on a page except for the words a, an, and, the etc. Other spiders keep track of the title, subheadings and links, along with the 100 most frequently used words on the page. Others take note of every single word. Meta tags as hashtags and similar stuff were created to help spiders find relevant information. Another important task they do is to build the index in which the user will search and choose the result he wants. To make useful results most search engines store more than just the word and the URL where it was found, an engine might store the amount of times a word was used on a page, whether the word was found in the title, subhead or meta tags.

2. Please research and add another 10 questions to the briefing process.(See the lesson.

Here is the list we got on the lesson, the question I have added are written in purple and bold:

  1. What kind of visitors are you expecting on your website? (Consider their income, interests, gender and age.)

This question helps you to understand the potential visitors better. If you know who your target audience is, you can plan the website design and development in a way that would appeal to them. Obviously a site for teenagers will be very different from a site for working moms or businessmen.

  1. Who are your competitors and how do you differ from them?

Most clients will have some competition in cyberspace. Find out what they think of their competitors, how they differ from them and what their strengths and weaknesses are.

  1. What actions do you want visitors to take on the site?

A website can sell products, provide information, educate or encourage a visitor to make a phone call or fill out a form. Depending on the client’s needs the website structure, functionality and design can vary substantially.

  1. What is your deadline for completing the site? How big is the budget?

These questions help you manage the client’s expectations. Your purpose is to set clear and realistic time frames, which are linked to the budget. In other words, your client can’t expect you to build an extensive website in a day’s time. And they can’t pay for a beat up old VW Beatle and expect a Porsche.

  1. What features should be used on your website? (This includes things like contact forms, pictures, videos, etc.)

We need to know what the client would like to have on the website and manage expectations accordingly. A small company website doesn’t need to have as many features as media portal. Some clients may know exactly what features they would like, while others might have no clue. Guide them by asking questions and showing them examples of other websites.

  1. Please list the names of three sites that you like and explain what you like about them.

Very often a potential client already knows what their website should look like or be similar to, so there’s no need to re-invent the wheel. Be sure to pay attention to exactly what the client wants, otherwise you could waste valuable time and money.

  1. Do you have any colour preferences? What should the look and feel for the website be?

Since colour is a very subjective thing, a client may not have the same colour preferences as you do. It’s always a good idea to come up with a colour palette beforehand and show the client what you have in mind. (Keep the colour theory modules of Design 1 and 2 in mind.) You might not always agree with the clients’ choices, but part of being a good designer is being able to make their preferences look good.

  1. Who will be the contact person for this project?

Sometimes big companies have more than one person working on a project. Since people have different opinions and ideas, this could get quite chaotic. Ask the client for one contact person that you can deal with if you have questions or need feedback.

  1. What do you NOT want on your site in terms of text, content, colour and graphic elements?

Sometimes it is as important to know what your client doesn’t like as it is to know what he or she does like. This can help you get a full picture of what the client has in mind for the site.

  1. Who will be responsible for maintaining the website? Will the person have the time and skills to do so?  

If your client asks for a forum, blog or social media integration, they need to understand the time requirements from within their company. They need to make sure that they have the resources available for such a commitment.

11.  Do you and your staff need training on handling and maintaining the web site?

12. What level of control do you really need over your site’s content? ( this will be important when choosing how to build the site so it is user-friendly but also customer friendly. ask about what kind of control they need) 

13. what is the exact motive and reason for the new design or for creating a website for your business? ( is the other one outdated, why do they think so, Do they need to advertise on more places for their products, are they trying to get a wider target audience… The reason might help you solve the problem) 

14. What will be the budget of the web page? ( This is important to know right away so that you can plan everything better from the very start) 

15. Present your business, what do you love about it and what are you most proud of? ( the answer of this question will give you tips on what content is the most important to include in the page and how the page should look to represent their bussiness) 

16. the scope of the project, what do you  want, and what did you hire me to do ? 

17. how many platforms do you  plan to expand the project  to? ( this relates to mobile devices, computers, tablets..)

18. What tone or image do you need to portray ? ( how do they want  to be seen) 

19. How should approvals or presentation of projects be handled? (this makes it easier for you both in the long run) 

20. Ask them about previous designs and marketing materials. ( In this way you assure that their look stays consistent, which is actually a very good thing) 

3. From this list of 20 questions (your 10 added to my 10), please create the ultimate list of 10 questions that you would use for clients.

  1. What kind of visitors are you expecting on your website? (Consider their income, interests, gender and age.)

This question helps you to understand the potential visitors better. If you know who your target audience is, you can plan the website design and development in a way that would appeal to them. Obviously a site for teenagers will be very different from a site for working moms or businessmen.

2. What actions do you want visitors to take on the site?A website can sell products, provide information, educate or encourage a visitor to make a phone call or fill out a form. Depending on the client’s needs the website structure, functionality and design can vary substantially.

3. What is your deadline for completing the site? How big is the budget?These questions help you manage the client’s expectations. Your purpose is to set clear and realistic time frames, which are linked to the budget. In other words, your client can’t expect you to build an extensive website in a day’s time. And they can’t pay for a beat up old VW Beatles and expect a Porsche.   

4. Who will be the contact person for this project?
Sometimes big companies have more than one person working on a project. Since people have different opinions and ideas, this could get quite chaotic. Ask the client for one contact person that you can deal with if you have questions or need feedback.

5. What do you NOT want on your site in terms of text, content, colour and graphic elements?
Sometimes it is as important to know what your client doesn’t like as it is to know what he or she does like. This can help you get a full picture of what the client has in mind for the site.

6. How should approvals or presentation of projects be handled? (this makes it easier for you both in the long run) 

7. Present your business, what do you love about it and what are you most proud of? ( the answer of this question will give you tips on what content is the most important to include in the page and how the page should look to represent their bussiness) 

8. What level of control do you really need over your site’s content? ( this will be important when choosing how to build the site so it is user-friendly but also customer friendly. ask about what kind of control they need) 

9. what is the exact motive and reason for the new design or for creating a website for your business? ( is the other one outdated, why do they think so, Do they need to advertise on more places for their products, are they trying to get a wider target audience… The reason might help you solve the problem).

10. What tone or image do you need to portray?

 

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s